The Future of Heart Rate Tracking with AI

Reinventing the wheel isn’t always easy. The sentiment applies more so in the space of sensor tech, wherein the only advancements that can be made are more often in the efficiency of measurement, footprint reduction and more sensitive recording parameters.

But then, there’s also the concept of reinventing the applications of the wheel. And that’s what advancements in sensor technology are all about. Heart rate sensors have moved on from their avatar of simply measuring heart rate, to more advanced applications such as pointing out exactly when and why there was a spike in the heart rate.

All this being said, what’s new in the world of heart rate sensors? And is Apple making some headway in this regard?

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The State of Wearables: Q2, 2017

Cheap wearables have always been key drivers in the wearable market, with Fitbit and Xiaomi going neck to neck for the top berth in the battle for market share. While budget wearables are showing potential this quarter, there’s now a growing need for Apple to come up with more innovative features for the Apple Watch.

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Diffrential Privacy with AI and the future of health tracking

One of the major reasons people are vary of jumping onto the self-tracking wagon is privacy of their data. Granted, when you’re trusting a fitness tracker to record how much you’ve run and how your heart rate varies, you’re trusting a slew of services that are working in the background. How can that balance be achieved?

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The Health Insurance Industry is being disrupted by lifelogging technologies

Here’s an open secret to start things off: Connected technologies are evolving like never before. We’ve always seen the advent of wearable manufacturers and have seen different use cases for trackers, and while the market might be plateauing a little, it’s opening a window to explore more varied use cases.

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AI: Powering Next-Gen Consumer Technology

A couple of days back, I came across this application which scans your face and automatically adds dynamics – it makes you look older, younger, can add or modify your smile and even show how you’d look if you were of the opposite gender. A novelty app at best, FaceApp does bring about the big question: Can AI actually power the next generation of consumer technology?

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In Numbers – The Rise of Huawei

What makes a good smartphone brand, a great one? Innovation? Definitely. Collaboration with big brands? Works in the longer run. A presence in non-smartphone areas? More fishing rods in the pond, right? It’s quite a given, actually: a smartphone brand cannot be great by following a singular path.

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The State of Quantified Self in 2016

We’re heading into the last couple of weeks of 2016, and this has been a pretty significant year for the Quantified Self. From the leaders in the wearable market seeing unprecedented losses, to a big merger some weeks back, to a spectacle that made lifelogging sexy again: we’ve seen it all this year.

Looking back, the numbers really tell a story. A story where some areas might be plateauing out, but at the same time creating areas for other aspects of the Quantified Self. And these trendlines shall form the crux of this article, as this author rewinds things by a year so that we can see everything from a bigger perspective – panning out over the twelve months of 2016!

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The Middle Ground: Is it possible to lifelog using an iPad?

When we think about ‘lifelogging’, more often than not the gadgets envisioned as the tracking instruments take the form of a wearable device – such as a wrist, arm, or even a head band. The next plausible device to don the garb of a tracking device would be a smartphone.

But tracking with an iPad? That’s pushing things a little too far, right?

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